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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 23
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
and early to prevent the tremendous loss of life that follows the administration of president johnson and president nixon. bearing in mind as the americans died under nixon as did other jobs and. -- johnson. so my colleague wrote the best and the brightest at the wrong place at the wrong time and i did not necessarily agree with him that but i do now but even the extended effort could have forestalled the ultimate dash a list victory which would have meant the us a promise a of vietnam's at that time. that is the best i can do in the allotted time. >> we will wrap it up. >> we will be hitting around for a little while. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> jfk and the senate halfway through the president say. with the 50th anniversary of the kennedy assassination , was it a benefit to publish your book at this time or did it hurt? >> it was a mixed blessing of course, there was a tidal wave of interest but yet it's there was an avalanche of books for. it was almost a very crowded field parker the perfect world that may have come down at a different time but
. johnson with vietnam. nixon with watergate. force truncated presidency. jimmy carter's one term. the first bush one term. the second bush leaves under a cloud. so they look to two presidents to give them better hope in feeling about the government. first off, kennedy, reagan in this poll which kennedy had 85% approval, reagan had 74%. so people remember that kennedy -- yo he put a man on the moon, that he called his administration the new frontier. he has frozen our minds at the age of 46, and nobody could quite imagine if he walked into this room tonight, he would be 96 years old. it's 50 years later. but he is still young, vital, energetic, a celebrity, and exciting personnel. people are attached to that, and i think -- what comes to mind, my teacher was richard hofstetter, the great historian. and dick once said to me that america is the only country in the world that believes it was more perfect and strives for improvement. [laughter] and this is what in a since kennedy gives to people this day. i'd say one other thing, which is that the kennedys are a americans dynasty. not the roosev
on johnson, and one of the things he talked about i find very interesting, is the transition of power from, of course, kennedy, to johnson, and the fact that was such a seamless transition because you had this horrible event, and suddenly -- and the government doesn't crumble. and of course, when that is going on, i, who lived in the 19th century, think about the lincoln assassination, and the transition at that particular time to another johnson, andrew johnson, from tennessee, who was put on lincoln's ticket in 1864 election. i don't think anyone would have thought -- maybe they did -- lincoln was always thinking more of the thought, understandably but that andrew johnson would be president, there was a great deal of talk he was drunk at the inauguration, so, there was a transition which was right after -- days after -- it's hard to imagine -- days after appomattox. days after the war, and some in the south were actually still fighting. they didn't want to stop fight, and andrew johnson is the next president, and a lot of knee. congress, called the radical republicans, they looked to joh
.s. government from president kennedy in particular and president john johnson made it their job to lobby to lobby with television and directives to shape the image coming out of vietnam and because of the nature there was never a declared war and there was a limited engagement beginning with advisors and then american troops and smaller groups finally becoming a large army of half a million. and this was never a conflict in which the u.s. government felt that it could impose the kind of censorship that was common in world war ii and korea and in that censorship, the journalists would be obligated to run photographs and written material and also publishers at home would be expected to take a patriotic look at what was going on or in overseas commitment. so when i go in 1962, i was joined by a group of american journalists who were very unique at that time. all of them graduates from ivy league universities and probably the first to actually enter the cross of news reporting and they took it as a much more pragmatic approach as to what was going on in vietnam, and it covered the civil righ
, nixon, and johnson, but i'm curious how truman helped eisenhower. >> very quickly, a little something on that. >> the question is, could you -- i worked with his successors. how did truman work with him. >> thank you. >> i don't know if you saw the -- >> how did president truman work with eisenhower? when eisenhower was president of columbia and then after leaving the office of -- well, let's go back before that. in berlin in 1945, president truman offered to step down as the nominee if eisenhower would accept the nomination. when it came time to get things off the ground in 1950 and 1951, eisenhower -- president truman asked eisenhower if he would leave the presidency of columbia and go back to europe to organize nato, which generalizen hour did, and eisenhower was there when he came back in 1952 to run for the republican nomination. so there was great respect between the two, and one of the reasons truman did not seek a third -- seek re-election in 1952, was because ike got the republican nomination. if cass had gotten the nomination, truman would have stayed the democratic candidat
, a consequential senator. he was not a master of the senate a la lyndon johnson, but he was very active this foreign policy debates, very active in the discussion about vietnam, algeria, the soviet union. he also did something kind of interesting, he chaired a special committee to determine the five best senators in american history. this was a committee that lyndon johnson created for himself, grew tired of it, handed it off to ken kennedy -- kennedy. so this was in some sense the one project that kennedy was in charge of during his senate career. he took it very seriously, you know, inquired of all the great historians in the country and spent six, seven months really digging into this, came up with a list of the five greatest senators, and it was something that became part of his identity as being a young politician, but also someone very steeped in american history. so -- >> who came out at the top of that list? >> el, there was robert taft and robert concern. [inaudible] were the two 20th century ones. but the big ones were john calhoun, daniel webster, henry clay. the great triumv
, but in regards to the johnson biog, we're in the same boat. i've been writing about lin don johnson so long that people ask me, don't you get bored? the answer is that the very opposite is true. the one reason i don't think of these books being about lyndon johnson like i didn't think of the power brokers about robert moses, i never had the slightest interest in writing a book just to tell the life of the famous man. from the moment i first thought of doing books, i thought of biographies -- i thought of biographies as a way of examining the great forces that shape the times that they lived in, and, particularly, political power. why are political powers so important? well, we live in a democracy, so, ultimately, we have the power and the votes that we cast at the ballot boxes, and therefore, the more that we know about how political power really works, not as it's taught in textbooks, high schools, and colleges, but the raw naked reality of political power, the better our votes should be, and the bet or oir country should be. >> over the next few weeks, booktv, now in the 15th year on c-sp
letters include correspondences with the kennedy family, lyndon johnson, henry kissinger and william f. buckley. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, welcome, and thank you for that nice welcoming applause. and i want to thank you all for joining us for what i know is going to be a very special evening. as many of you know this year, vanderbilt welcomed john meacham with, i would say, wide arms and a very warm embrace as a distinguished visiting professor. [applause] and i think john has done well, and i hope we can take the visiting off pretty soon. [laughter] i would say that our political science students are just thrilled to have such a unique opportunity to learn from this accomplished historical scholar and celebrated to have. john's most recent book, "thomas jefferson: the art of power," rose to the coveted number one spot on "the new york times" bestseller list and was selected as one of the best books of the year by the times book review and the be washington post. and "the washington post." his best selling biography of andrew jackson, "american lion," earned him a puli
. the clerk: department of homeland security, jeh charles johnson of new jersey to be secretary of homeland security. the presiding officer: i send a -- mr. reid: i send a cloture motion to the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: we the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 2269 standing rules of the senate move to bring to a close the debate on the nomination of jeh charles johnson of new jersey to be secretary of homeland security signed by 18 senators as follows. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the reading of the names be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i move to proceed to legislative session. the presiding officer: the question is on the motion to proceed. all those in favor say aye. all those opposed say nay. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes k do have it. the motion is agreed to. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today it adjourn until 10:00 a.m. on tuesday, december 10 and following the prayer and pledge the morning hour deemed expired, the journal of proc
would have put to a pat nixon or ladybird johnson. the difference was she was willing to respond. >> are mary said she was an inspiration perfect for the times. one of the things we have been covering is the changing role of women in society. how the first lady is often a benchmark for that. >> i think that's is where i think she connected with millions of women, you know, she was candid about her personal struggles. she was -- a lot of people didn't realize when she became first lady she had been married before. i think bonnie with "time magazine" correspondent asked her about that. and why people didn't know about it. she said no one bothered to ask her before. in 1957, i remember the first name her ever appeared in "the washington post, and it was about her fashion sensibility. it talked about her taste for quiet hat and slightly more talkative suits. in 1957, that was fine. that have one culture. a lot of people looked at betty ford, this cub scout den mother. a sunday schoolteacher and labeled her. they wrote her off, in effect. then they discovered no, actually this is a wo
not duck the question how he fashioned his own celebrated with how they dissented future johnson who he thought a good man that rather be schaede -- rutherford b. hayes. but then said i have contradicted. but then to soak up his * no way he tried to make his country of sorghum. this cultural biography demonstrates the consideration and raised the bid beefy renaissance anticipate the america that are a visible and workable. not only does it raise the question of what literary criticism is it raises the same questions regarding the form such literary criticism can take. so with a certain low-key assertion and then a cultural biography. and then the way that respects to go so far to suggest in 1985 of the term cultural biography was considered in the academy as the stepchild of history and the embarrassing cousin of literary or other criticism regressive without a theoretical foundation. . . of individualism. and of course biographies up to the first and is not very passÉ. recently praising stanley crouch's new book, "new york times" reviewer says it's not about getting his knees dirty, r
the problems with the web site will be what he will be remembered for. :did johnson isn't he could have if he dismissed it and to focus on the job situation with the french industry. but then he did take advantage of that. just like and 1965 when he could pass this legislation for medicare and civil-rights. to get into the second term the house's children's republicans they cannot do very much. >> we probably have a slightly different take but what do you take is his assessment of the preparation obviously obamacare two office with the world collapsing around have. but president bush 43 said hank paulson of a bike to help you but i would do more harm than good but what frustrates people that are of of the supporters is there doesn't seem to be if the idea of powell of where he wants to go or how he gets there we go double down he has a staff meeting before i want to go back to my agenda of climate change to the immigration and they are in this light the state of for because they know those are not the issues. somehow we prepare people that obama is somebody to look at as a model. >> that is a
johnson said the release, and he meant that in a bad way, that was intelligence. so you -- [laughter] you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] there's another metaphor that i hear, the famous comment that we, in the intelligence community, like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world an say we are at the cross roads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. we hope you policymakers will be able to have the wisdom to choose the right course. [laughter] in fact, in my experience and experience i think we relate today on the bulcans is it is when it works well, a collaborative enterprise with vast capabilities to bring to the fight, but also with clear limitations to be understood by leaders who know they can ask a lot, but not too much of the intelligence business, and by intelligence leaders who know they can't promise too much. this has to be worked out among reasonable people, and we had that in the bulcans. as a teacher in georgetown, when i render a compliment, there's a historic backdrop here. wh
asked us to carry out. i thank you you know that my time. >> thank you, ms. johnson. members can submit them for the record and they will appear at this point. or witness today's the honorable gina mccarthy, administrator of the environmental protection agency. prior to her appointment as administrator, she was the assistant administrator for epa's office of air and radiation or she advocated to protect public health and the environment. during her career, which spans over 30 years, she's the head with the state local levels on environmental issues and helps coordinate policies and academic growth, energy transportation and environment. administrator mccarthy received a bachelor virge degrees social anthropology from university of massachusetts and a masters of science and environmental health, engineering and planning are the tests university. at this time, i yield to the gentleman from connecticut for additional comments. >> thank you, chairman smith and ranking member johnson for holding today's hearing on the environmental protection agency. i'm very pleased gina mccarthy who served
. so i'll just finish by recounting some words that lyndon johnson who was a master legislature said once. johnson grew up poor in the hill country in texas. his family couldn't always take for granted that they were going to have enough to give the roof over their head or keep food on the table, so this is the thought i'll be with you. johnson once said that any man who is not willing to compromise, well, that men never went to bed hungry. he said, you know, the actions that any man who is not willing to settle for half a loaf, well, that meant never went to bed hungry. that's exactly right. the american people expect us to be problem solvers and practical solution providers, not happening right now because we're too intent on taking an all or nothing approach which leads to nothing. so having said all that, i'm pleased to be with you today. senator, i'll turn it over to you. [applause] >> thank you. it's quite a privilege to be on the stage with these two distinguished gentlemen. the form of today, i do have some prepared questions, but we also want to open this up do all of you. i
johnson when he described intelligence, he developed the memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down at the river as a young man, and he said he would get the bucket filled with pure milk and then the cat would relieve itself in the milk. and president johnson said the relief -- and he met relief in the bad way -- that was intelligence. [laughter] so you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] but there is another metaphor that i often hear and that is the famous woody allen comment that we in the intelligence community like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world and say, we are at a crossroads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. [laughter] and we hope you policymakers would be able to the wisdom to choose the right course. but, in fact, in my experience and the spirits i think we're going to relate today on the balkans is that intelligence is, when it works well, a collaborative enterprise. fast capabilities to bring to the fight but also with clear limitations to be understood by lead
georgia mr. johnson, is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. for holding this very important and significant hearing today. get my notes squared away. this hearing is pure political theater. it's a comedy but the audience has seen it so many times now that it's no longer funny. in fact, this hearing is an egregious waste of this committee's time. especially when one considers all of the legislation that remains unaddressed by the house, like immigration reform. the senate has passed comprehensive immigration reform by the speaker of the house continues to refuse to bring the issue to the house floor. yesterday, as house members walked down the capitol steps on their way home from an exhausting one hour workday, i watched as most members had their heads down. they wanted to avoid eye contact with the 60 or so young people standing at the foot of the steps in the cold wind. they had their hands clasped together, the young people, in prayer. their prayer was on behalf of those families and immigrants that are being destroyed as a result of this nations failed to pass c
"the cancer and the author, george johnson, talks about the evidence that dinosaurs had cancer. but cancer is found in many kinds of animals. it is found in the remains of egyptians varied -- buried several thousand years ago. it is a phenomenon of life, specially human life. there is a variety of factors that can increase the risk of any single individual developing cancer. by far the greatest in our society is use of tobacco. but obesity, lack of exercise, alcohol use, exposure to sunlight are among some of the causes. is not as -- asbestos longer use but is another cause. yes marco we need vitamin d. it there are other ways to get vitamin d. modest exposure to sunlight is very different than the kinds of anosures that lead to ordinance numbers of mutations as a result of uv exposures. most people get plenty of vitamin d. deficiencies in vitamin d can't .e repaired i taking it orally host: how important is it to listen to your body? early detection and early wariness in terms of riveting or allowing you to live with cancer and it being treated, regardless of the type of cance
days, been talking with rob portman who knows a lot about the irs. ron johnson who is a manufacture was elected to the city in wisconsin would be a good example. mike barr just as a medical doctor who served in the u.s. house. carries around bashing his a smart phone, but a smartphone has an app that does cardiology. so he can cash in your getting an electrocardiogram on his smartphone. he forgets where he going and what we're trying to college. tim griffin is a great congressman from arkansas. florida knows the jump direction where to go when. there's enough to be hopeful about. >> mr. speaker, we are taking questions from youtube. we've been online all week so we have some that people had e-mailed him and we will start now with the first one. because you can't see the screen, i will we get to you. how would you rate the president obama's foreign policy compared to that of richard nixon? this is from kevin jacobsen. [laughter] >> i don't know. without getting myself into much trouble, it would be like how you compare a bunny and a german shepherd. [applause] i mean, i really do wor
the robert wood johnson university hospital where i serve on the board to be in total honesty area because we have a lot of experience but he also had to take care of patients today. so he did share some thoughts and are there any physicians in the house? very good. so we have some physicians in the house that mean he would like to respond to that. but this notion that carol raised and then linda, too, about this tug of war and this includes nurse practitioners and physician's assistants to my understanding getting involved in this, too. we want to admit the person and we understand that this is great to be a financial burden and clinically this person should be in admission, but it's going to be challenged and there will be financial ramifications for the hospital and one of the things i will add and maybe a physician can say something about this that the physician payment is not effective. maybe it's like $5 less. whether you are an advocate patient or an observation patient. so there isn't any particular financial incentives to try to spend the extra time, the paperwork, the burdens it tak
after her death until thomas h. johnson came along and found her in the library in 1935 and suddenly this complete unknown and people have this really great stuff. again, i don't want to necessarily make a hierarchy of text, but i will say there's some text that identifiably, the same with narratives. i think it's right that, for example, frederick douglass and harry jacobs did they really do stand out intrinsically a little more than -- i read some of these narratives. there's a lot of thickness and energy and subversive energy in those two spectrums in particular and certain other works, were some of the others are very interesting and important in their own way, that may be lacking density a richness that you do find in frederick douglass. so anyway. >> some texts are better than others. i am not [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> and however and dirt outside. the thing is kind of throw it out there and hope for the best. when i published a conviction back back in 81, price books back in. it's about 300 or 350, something like that. they can barely sell it to libraries. the pri
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)